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Sorry! St. Domingo, Its Revolution and Its Hero, Toussaint Louverture; An Historical Discourse Condensed for the New York Library Association, February 26, is sold out.

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St. Domingo, Its Revolution and Its Hero, Toussaint Louverture; An Historical Discourse Condensed for the New York Library Association, February 26,

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Highlights

  • ISBN13:9781151645005
  • ISBN10:1151645001
  • Publisher:General Books
  • Language:English
  • Author:Charles Wyllys Elliott
  • Binding:Paperback
  • Sub Genre:General
  • SUPC: SDL068700485

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1855 Excerpt: ... III. The mulatto yet holds a doubtful place in the history and destiny of man. It is urged by many, that he has lost that pure and unlimited sensuous nature which, in the black, will be the basis for a new and surprising development, and that he has not gained the force of will and nervous intellectual power which, in the present time, gives the Caucasian race the control of the world. If this be so, we can look in them but for an imitative civilization and a temporary existence, and their large production in slave countries is then, at least, a waste. We will look at them for a moment as they existed in St. Domingo, where they nearly equaled the whites in numbers. When the Revolution broke out in France, lavish luxury abounded among the planters in the colony of St. Domingo; but the poor whites, "the petits blancs," were poor and discouraged, as they are in all slave communities, and were envious of the rich planters. The whites set up the tree of liberty, and shouted over the rights of man, as they did in Paris. The poor whites (the petits blancs) were bitter, the mulattoes discontent, and the slaves reckless, or sullen, or indifferent. The planters did not believe themselves fools or mad! When the mulatto Lacomb presented his petition to the authorities, asking the rights and privileges of a man, in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, he was only hanged for doing it. When a respectable planter, Beaudiere, at Petite Goave, presented a petition, asking for rights for the mulattoes, he was simply derided, and then torn in pieces. The temper of the times was hot. Many of the mulattoes were rich, many educated, with the tastes and manners of well-bred men. The whites hated them from the moment that it appeared that the "rights of man" included them, ...

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